So what if it’s not their fault!

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I never thought I would start a sentence this way — harking the lectures from my parents — but here goes:

I remember when life was simpler — and cheaper.

The cost for school lunch was 75 cents. A one-way bus fare was just a quarter. And tuition at the University of Hawaii at Manoa didn’t require a student loan.

In-state, full-time undergraduate students now pay $3,792 per semester in tuition. That’s more than $7,500 a year — a steal when you consider tuition elsewhere can cost upwards of $40,000 annually.

But that cost will likely go up next fall, should a proposal to the Board of Regents pass. The hike will be a reaction to possibly budget cuts by the state, which is trying to close a two-year, $1.3 billion budget deficit.

Should the proposal go through, students will pay $4,200 per semester — which doesn’t include the $314 per semester students pay in fees or the rising cost of books, computers and other expenses. (Don’t get me started on rent!)

Seems a bit unfair, if you ask me, to burden the state’s fiscal problems on students trying to get an education in order to make a go at this thing called life. Today’s economic woes are not their fault. In fact, these young people are the ones actually stimulating our economy, buying iPad 2s, filling their gas tanks with overpriced oil, and spending more on cell phone data plans than groceries a month.

And what are these students getting for the higher tuition cost? A better education? Updated textbooks? High-tech learning environments? Smaller classes? More classes? Better shot at getting a job after graduation?

I wonder.

9 comments
Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd
Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd

the reason I left off the coach is two-fold.

1. I was show the craziness by only listing 40-50 of the top 50.

2. When the team is good enough to play on ESPN UH gets an Automatic 1.4million advertiser revenue share. When we make a bole game we get another 2-4million to appear 6-8 to win. Coach has bowled us every season and we have been on ESPN a lot. He and his predecessor June earned their own salaries by performance. They are still the lowest paid HC's in the NCAA

Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd
Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd

the reason I left off the coach is two-fold. 1. I was show the craziness by only listing 40-50 of the top 50. 2. When the team is good enough to play on ESPN UH gets an Automatic 1.4million advertiser revenue share. When we make a bole game we get another 2-4million to appear 6-8 to win. Coach has bowled us every season and we have been on ESPN a lot. He and his predecessor June earned their own salaries by performance. They are still the lowest paid HC's in the NCAA

M
M

Hello Cat, everything keeps going up just like the gas. School lunch was a quarter and student bus fare was a dime when I was in high school.

M
M

Hello Cat, everything keeps going up just like the gas. School lunch was a quarter and student bus fare was a dime when I was in high school.

bumper
bumper

That is a lot of money. But I don't think it's fair to compare the salaries of university and CC professors; their responsibilities are quite different.

In order for UH to be a "top-tier research university," it must attract and secure highly-trained and specialized PhDs to teach, operate research projects (and bring in grant money), and publish novel research. While it's unfortunate that those research responsibilities often take away from their actual teaching time, that's the nature of the tenure-system and it's a necessary evil in keeping up UH's reputation as a nationally-recognized university.

CC professors have different responsibilities and are not required to have doctorates or conduct research, win grants to fund such research or publish in scholarly journals. They have more of a teaching focus, which I think is extremely important and, perhaps, more valuable to the young college student.

Having worked in the university system for a while, I can say that UH often has trouble recruiting top talent -- partially due to our isolated location and the pay scale (starting profs don't make anywhere near 6-figures). And personally, I would much rather take my skills and passions to a CC system without the "publish or perish" pressures, so that I could focus on teaching -- not keeping up the school's rankings or bringing in money to fund salaries -- even for much less pay. (Side: I can also say that when I've lectured at UH and CCs, I've received nearly the same salary per credit hour.)

Universities are expensive to operate, but where would we be without them? Still, it'd be nice to keep ours affordable for the local kids who want to stay here!

bumper
bumper

That is a lot of money. But I don't think it's fair to compare the salaries of university and CC professors; their responsibilities are quite different. In order for UH to be a "top-tier research university," it must attract and secure highly-trained and specialized PhDs to teach, operate research projects (and bring in grant money), and publish novel research. While it's unfortunate that those research responsibilities often take away from their actual teaching time, that's the nature of the tenure-system and it's a necessary evil in keeping up UH's reputation as a nationally-recognized university. CC professors have different responsibilities and are not required to have doctorates or conduct research, win grants to fund such research or publish in scholarly journals. They have more of a teaching focus, which I think is extremely important and, perhaps, more valuable to the young college student. Having worked in the university system for a while, I can say that UH often has trouble recruiting top talent -- partially due to our isolated location and the pay scale (starting profs don't make anywhere near 6-figures). And personally, I would much rather take my skills and passions to a CC system without the "publish or perish" pressures, so that I could focus on teaching -- not keeping up the school's rankings or bringing in money to fund salaries -- even for much less pay. (Side: I can also say that when I've lectured at UH and CCs, I've received nearly the same salary per credit hour.) Universities are expensive to operate, but where would we be without them? Still, it'd be nice to keep ours affordable for the local kids who want to stay here!

hilorain
hilorain

TO: Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd You forgot to list Greg McMackin at $1M,MMM,MMM. LOL. I have to agree that going the CC route is a real bargain, student-professor ratio is very valuable, and can be very helpful. hilorain

hilorain
hilorain

TO:

Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd

You forgot to list Greg McMackin at $1M,MMM,MMM. LOL.

I have to agree that going the CC route is a real bargain, student-professor ratio is very valuable, and can be very helpful.

hilorain

Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd
Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd

It is easy to blame the students but did you guys all forget about the crazy salary battles over the last few years. It is public information if you know how to google search. KCC teachers are way better than most of the "Endoctrinators" at US and most CC instructors get paid just under $60K. Here are some of the insane salaries at UH these tuition need to pay for. I'm only gonna show you the last ten entries of the top 50 at UH... Ready, (the list is here: http://bit.ly/elyZX7 )

Marjorie Mau, professor of medicine in the department of Native Hawaiian Health at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $218,760.

Alan Teramura, interim dean of the College of Natural Science at UH-Manoa, $214,440.

Magdy Iskander, professor and chair of the Hawaii Center for Advanced Communications at UH-Manoa, $214,344.

David Karl, professor of oceanography at UH-Manoa, $214,284.

Elizabeth Tam, professor of medicine in the biomedical science department at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $213,756.

Cecilia Shikuma, professor of medicine at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $212,544.

Tung Bui, professor of information technology management at UH-Manoa, $211,397.

Sylvia Yuen, interim dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at UH-Manoa, $210,528.

Brian Minaai, system associate vice president for capital improvements, $210,384.

Peter Englert, professor at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at UH-Manoa, $210,377. (Former chancellor of UH-Manoa campus from 2002 to 2005.)

Rockne Freitas, system vice president for student affairs and university/community relations, $209,256. (Former chancellor of Hawaii Community College in Hilo on the Big Island from 2004 to June 2010.)

Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd
Shawn "Doc Rock" Boyd

It is easy to blame the students but did you guys all forget about the crazy salary battles over the last few years. It is public information if you know how to google search. KCC teachers are way better than most of the "Endoctrinators" at US and most CC instructors get paid just under $60K. Here are some of the insane salaries at UH these tuition need to pay for. I'm only gonna show you the last ten entries of the top 50 at UH... Ready, (the list is here: http://bit.ly/elyZX7 ) Marjorie Mau, professor of medicine in the department of Native Hawaiian Health at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $218,760. Alan Teramura, interim dean of the College of Natural Science at UH-Manoa, $214,440. Magdy Iskander, professor and chair of the Hawaii Center for Advanced Communications at UH-Manoa, $214,344. David Karl, professor of oceanography at UH-Manoa, $214,284. Elizabeth Tam, professor of medicine in the biomedical science department at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $213,756. Cecilia Shikuma, professor of medicine at UH-Manoa’s medical school, $212,544. Tung Bui, professor of information technology management at UH-Manoa, $211,397. Sylvia Yuen, interim dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at UH-Manoa, $210,528. Brian Minaai, system associate vice president for capital improvements, $210,384. Peter Englert, professor at the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at UH-Manoa, $210,377. (Former chancellor of UH-Manoa campus from 2002 to 2005.) Rockne Freitas, system vice president for student affairs and university/community relations, $209,256. (Former chancellor of Hawaii Community College in Hilo on the Big Island from 2004 to June 2010.)

bumper
bumper

I'm not sure I agree with this particular tuition increase, but in general, UH is still a bargain and there are many sources of funding and pathways to a bachelor's degree (or higher) -- like starting off in the more affordable CC system, for example. I still believe it's do-able for the motivated student.

However, I would question students' personal priorities when, as you point out, "these young people are the ones actually stimulating our economy, buying iPad 2s, filling their gas tanks with overpriced oil, and spending more on cell phone data plans than groceries a month."

As a professional, I still don't own an iPad or a cell phone with a data plan, and I definitely didn't possess these luxuries when I was in college and grad school. I'd like to think that's how I afforded the many years of education I received at my top-choice mainland universities -- by making small sacrifices for much greater personal and professional payoffs. (No parental help, either.) Times are tough and many things "unfair," but the driven will still make it work!

bumper
bumper

I'm not sure I agree with this particular tuition increase, but in general, UH is still a bargain and there are many sources of funding and pathways to a bachelor's degree (or higher) -- like starting off in the more affordable CC system, for example. I still believe it's do-able for the motivated student. However, I would question students' personal priorities when, as you point out, "these young people are the ones actually stimulating our economy, buying iPad 2s, filling their gas tanks with overpriced oil, and spending more on cell phone data plans than groceries a month." As a professional, I still don't own an iPad or a cell phone with a data plan, and I definitely didn't possess these luxuries when I was in college and grad school. I'd like to think that's how I afforded the many years of education I received at my top-choice mainland universities -- by making small sacrifices for much greater personal and professional payoffs. (No parental help, either.) Times are tough and many things "unfair," but the driven will still make it work!

Kim
Kim

I'm worried that in 5-10 years it might be harder to even get into community colleges as students might opt to go there instead of UH since it's cheaper. Gotta start funding those 529 plans for my grandchildren now.

Kim
Kim

I'm worried that in 5-10 years it might be harder to even get into community colleges as students might opt to go there instead of UH since it's cheaper. Gotta start funding those 529 plans for my grandchildren now.

WildeOscar
WildeOscar

I am a lot more concerned about cuts in funding for Pre-K and elementary education, special education for the developmentally disabled, and support for disabled adults. As painful as it is for students and their families in a time of high unemployment and flat or declining wages, this is one of the more sane proposals on the table. It is also happening in every state in the country, at the community college level and above.

For a student living at home and committed to finish a bachelors degree in four years, and committed to do something with the rest of his or her life other than sit on a couch and play videogames and smoke dope for the 60 years that follow, financing the cost of a UH education remains an excellent decision.

WildeOscar
WildeOscar

I am a lot more concerned about cuts in funding for Pre-K and elementary education, special education for the developmentally disabled, and support for disabled adults. As painful as it is for students and their families in a time of high unemployment and flat or declining wages, this is one of the more sane proposals on the table. It is also happening in every state in the country, at the community college level and above. For a student living at home and committed to finish a bachelors degree in four years, and committed to do something with the rest of his or her life other than sit on a couch and play videogames and smoke dope for the 60 years that follow, financing the cost of a UH education remains an excellent decision.

jaydee
jaydee

Unfortunately, when states are in a severe budget crisis, education is always the one to suffer. Most states spend more on criminals and the prison system than they do on students and their future. The cost for a state education is still a lot more affordable than private universities but when will the the budgets cuts for education end?

jaydee
jaydee

Unfortunately, when states are in a severe budget crisis, education is always the one to suffer. Most states spend more on criminals and the prison system than they do on students and their future. The cost for a state education is still a lot more affordable than private universities but when will the the budgets cuts for education end?